Thread: That time Disney produced a China-based Aladdin movie starring an all white cast, and scrubbed it from the internet.

shower

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In 1990, two years before the animated film, the Disney Channel produced an Aladdin musical movie. Directed by Mickey Dolenz (the Monkee), it's an all around terrible yet hilarious 'film.'

The interesting part of the movie is how almost no one seems to acknowledge it exists. Doing a google search pulls up an IMDB (3.6 stars with 130 reviews), a completely blank RT (with the year of the animated film) and a random blog post. The rest of the results seem to be entirely referring to the animated film.

Equally interesting, a youtube search returns the full movie in its entirety (bless Multicom). However, there are 0 reviews, commentaries, or mentions from any other youtube channel, beyond a couple short clips. You would think at least one internet movie reviewer would have made a video about this, right?




Shout out to the insensitive gong sound every 10 minutes, naming the white guy 'Aladdin Sew-and-Sew,' and Barry Bostwick for channeling the most unlikable spastic character to ever be filmed on video.
 
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So the animated Aladdin and live action remake were brown washed?
Arabs used China as an exotic setting like we use Arabia as an exotic setting.
The story has a Sultan and the villain who is explicitly Maghrebi pretends to be Aladdin's uncle. There's no way to portray movie Aladdin as a Chinese dude who believes a Berber is his father's brother.

The setting is meant to be relatable to Arabs but with the extra cool factor of "dude this is actually in China not here lol". While the intended audience was vaguely familiar with China, it was not meant to be taken seriously and deconstructed and so on. The original author made it up in a couple of hours for a guy who had a book of exotic tales to finish.
 
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Arabs used China as an exotic setting like we use Arabia as an exotic setting.
The story has a Sultan and the villain who is explicitly Maghrebi pretends to be Aladdin's uncle. There's no way to portray movie Aladdin as a Chinese dude who believes a Berber is his father's brother.

The setting is meant to be relatable to Arabs but with the extra cool factor of "dude this is actually in China not here lol". While the intended audience was vaguely familiar with China, it was not meant to be taken seriously and deconstructed and so on. The original author made it up in a couple of hours for a guy who had a book of exotic tales to finish.
Like when Hollywood sets movies in the South.